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EEP UP WITH YOUR HEALTH, KNOWLEDGE IS THE POWER TO IMPROVE.

NEWSWORTHY: THE EAT SMART SYSTEM WILL HELP TO KEEP YOU UP TO DATE WITH YOUR HEALTH.

KEEP UP WITH YOUR HEALTH, KNOWLEDGE IS THE POWER TO IMPROVE.

MARSHALL SAYS:
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YOU WILL HAVE CONTROL.

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THIS IS NOT A DIET, IT'S PERMANENT CHANGE AND YOU WILL FEEL BETTER AND LOOK YOUNGER. THE TYPICAL BENEFITS ARE  REDUCING  STRESS LEVELS, YOU WILL  IMPROVE YOUR HEART RATE AND BLOOD PRESSURE,  MOOD SWINGS, AND BODY FAT LEVEL, LOWER CHOLESTEROL, LOOK AND ACT YOUNGER NOW, AGE GRACEFULLY, RESTING AND WORK LOAD HEART RATE  AND KNOWLEDGE OF GOAL SETTING TECHNIQUES.

 YOU WILL BE GOING THROUGH LIFE'S TRIALS AND TRIBULATIONS WITH GREATLY REDUCED STRESS. YOU WILL  INCREASE ENDURANCE, FLEXIBILITY,

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New research shows that moderate drinking can cut the risk of cancer and other diseases.

Yes, Coffee Can Be Good for You

                       By Dr. Isadore Rosenfeld


Regular coffee drinkers, of whom there are about 165 million in this country alone, undoubtedly wonder from time to time, “How many cups can I safely drink each day?” This worry is a conditioned response, because coffee has been blamed over the years for everything from heart disease to cancer. The possibility that it actually is good for us rarely, if ever, crosses our minds.

More Good Than Harm
Over the decades, there have been more than 19,000 studies looking into the dangers and benefits of coffee. Some of them are open to interpretation, but here’s my take on the research: For most people, drinking no more than three cups of coffee a day does more good than harm. Remember, however, that one’s tolerance to coffee can vary, so even a small amount can make you nervous and irritable if you happen to be sensitive to it. This is especially true if you’re unwittingly consuming additional caffeine present in certain energy drinks, colas, tea, chocolate, and various cold and headache remedies.

But there’s much more to coffee than the caffeine. Coffee has antioxidants—the substances also present in tea, fruits and vegetables that enhance overall health. It also contains a host of antibacterial compounds that protect against infection (one of them even helps prevent dental cavities). Other ingredients may reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes (although you should reduce your coffee intake if you do develop the disease).

Coffee’s benefits affect the entire body—from preventing gallstones to reducing  symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (by allowing the release of dopamine into the brain) and even preserving cognitive function. Recently, a 10-year study in Europe of nearly 700 healthy elderly men revealed that those who drank at least three cups of coffee per day maintained better brain function.

Coffee and Cholesterol
Does coffee raise cholesterol levels? Only when it is boiled or prepared using a French press, as is widely done in Europe. In the United States, where coffee is usually filtered and percolated, it has not been shown  to increase cholesterol levels.

Also, if your blood pressure is normal, coffee is not likely to elevate it. Doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital found that even five cups of coffee a day do not significantly increase pressure in healthy men, although just one cup may do so if you have hypertension.

Most doctors, including me, do not believe that moderate coffee drinking over a lifetime is bad for your heart or vascular system. (A recent report, however, did suggest that it could lead to a heart attack in persons with a particular gene—a rare finding.)

On the positive side, coffee may:

• relieve headaches.

• reduce the risk of colorectal and breast cancer.

• enhance physical endurance.

• protect against cirrhosis of the liver.

• improve performance of tasks.

So here’s the bottom line for you coffee lovers. Most side effects occur at high doses (see box). Still, patients with heart disease and cardiac-rhythm problems, high blood pressure, active gout or stomach ulcers should reduce or eliminate their intake. The rest of us who look forward to our morning cup of coffee should have no qualms about drinking it. Moderation is the key.




Some Reasons to Cut Back

The most serious problems from coffee—especially of excessive intake—are caffeine dependence and cardiac-rhythm disturbances (in those predisposed to such  irregularities). Too much coffee also may produce these negative effects:

• a decrease in the absorption of B vitamins.

• an increase in uric acid, which can cause kidney stones and gout.

• an increase in the excretion of calcium, potassium, magnesium and trace minerals, which can worsen osteoporosis.

• the production of excess adrenaline, causing a “high,” then fatigue and irritability.

• heartburn (reflux) or aggravation of an existing ulcer.

"HEALTH IS YOUR WEALTH. FOLLOW MY ADVICE AND A HEALTHY MORE PRODUCTIVE LIFE WILL BENEFIT YOU."


KEEP UP WITH YOUR HEALTH, KNOWLEDGE IS THE POWER TO IMPROVE.
Most Americans get about half of the recommended 25 grams of fiber each day. With Fiber One® cereal, it's easier than ever to increase your daily fiber intake. Try using these 10 simple tips to help reach your fiber goals.

Fiber—Just the facts, ma’am.

Dietary Fiber is the part of plant foods that your body doesn’t digest. Fiber, therefore, helps with regularity and has been shown to have other health benefits, as well.

There are two types of dietary fiber used in the labeling of food products – both are important for good health.

Soluble fiber dissolves in water and is found in foods like beans and other legumes, fruits, and oat products (e.g. Oatmeal, Cheerios®). Soluble fiber can help lower cholesterol levels, and therefore can help reduce the risk of heart disease.

Insoluble fiber is considered to be the “gut-healthy fiber” because one of its roles is supporting regularity. It does not dissolve in water and can be found in whole grain products (e.g. whole wheat bread, ready to eat cereals made with whole grain, such as Fiber One cereals), and vegetables.

Health benefits of fiber you can digest.

Getting the recommended levels of fiber may lead to many healthy rewards.

Weight Management
  • Getting enough fiber can also help curb your hunger and help you feel satisfied, which can help with weight management. Research suggests that people who have higher intakes of fiber tend to have healthier body weights.
  • High fiber foods, like Fiber One cereal, may help with managing caloric intake.
Digestive Health
  • The most recognized benefit of fiber is its important role in keeping the digestive system running smoothly by promoting regularity. Fiber adds bulk to help move food through the digestive tract.
  • Along with regular exercise and plenty of water, fiber plays an important part in maintaining digestive health.
Heart Health
  • Fiber – specifically soluble fiber – may also help lower blood cholesterol levels, thereby reducing the risk for heart disease. Fiber appears to lower cholesterol by interfering with its absorption in the digestive tract.
Diabetes
  • Fiber may also be important for people who have diabetes. Diets high in whole grain and fiber have been shown to help people with diabetes manage their blood sugar and cholesterol levels.

When it comes to maintaining good health, the evidence is clear—fiber can play an important role!

How much fiber is needed?

  • The 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans clearly recommend that all Americans choose fiber containing foods more often.
  • Government experts from the National Academy of Science recommend that most people get at least 25 grams of fiber per day, with some needing even more.
  • Unfortunately, many Americans miss out on the benefits of fiber, because they get too little fiber each day. The average American struggles to get the minimum of 25 grams of fiber each day.
  • Women, between the ages of 20-55 years old, on average, are only getting 56% of their recommended daily fiber.
  • Men, between the ages of 20-55 years old, on average, are only getting 47% of their recommended daily fiber.

That funny, rumbly feeling.

  • One of the side effects of increasing fiber intake is an increase in intestinal gas. But don’t let this be a deterrent! Over time the body will adjust to increased fiber levels.
  • Top tips for increasing fiber:
    • Increase the level of fiber in your diet slowly
    • Drink plenty of water to help the body adjust. Aim for eight 8-oz glasses of water each day.
    http://www .fiberone. com/Benefits/Default. aspx

10 TIPS TO GET YOUR DAILY FIBER:

Scan for Bran

Look for “bran,” “whole grain” and “whole wheat” on product packages and ingredient labels. These ingredients can help boost fiber intake.

½ cup Fiber One Original = 14g fiber

1 cup Fiber One Honey Clusters® = 13g fiber

2) Grab the Whole Food

Munch on a whole piece of fruit, in place of drinking a glass of juice. You’ll get the nutrients and the fiber too.

1 medium apple = 3g fiber

3) Savor the Skins

Eat fruit and vegetables with the skin on. Eating the skin helps to bump up the fiber, plus it provides texture and a bonus of other nutrients.

1 medium baked potato with skin on = 4g fiber

4) Screen for Beans

Replace your typical side dishes with high-fiber dried peas and beans, such as kidney, pinto, lentils or black-eyed peas. These fiber-packed legumes make it easier to meet daily fiber goals.

½ cup canned red kidney beans = 8g fiber

5) Go Nuts

Jazz up salads, vegetables, snacks and desserts with almonds, sunflower seeds or soy nuts. Nuts and seeds add fiber and fun-to-chew crunch to foods.

1 ounce roasted almonds = 3g fiber

6) Be Berry Wild

Choose raspberries, blackberries and boysenberries to add variety to your cereals. These berries have twice the fiber of many other fruit selections.

½ cup fresh raspberries = 4g fiber

7) Bring on the Brown

Use brown rice instead of white. Switch to whole-wheat pasta, whole-wheat flour whole-wheat breads and whole-grain crackers instead of regular white versions.

1 cup brown rice = 3g fiber

8) Skip the Chips

Select snacks that are a good source of fiber. Instead of potato chips, go for low-fat popcorn, whole-grain pretzels or oven-crisped whole-wheat pita triangles.

3 cups popcorn = 4g fiber

9) Drink Up

Water is a healthy beverage choice—especially as you up the fiber. Your body needs more water to help process the added fiber you eat.

Aim for eight 8-oz glasses of water each day.

10) Sneak in Some Fiber One® cereal

Mix Fiber One cereal into your favorite side dishes or top yogurt, salads or oatmeal. Even a small amount of Fiber One cereal makes a difference.

¼ cup Fiber One cereal for sprinkling = 7g fiber

http://www .fiberone. com/Benefits/Default. aspx
By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer
WASHINGTON (AP) -

 Ten minutes of brisk exercise triggers metabolic changes that last at least an hour. The unfair news for panting newbies:
The more fit you are, the more benefits you just might be getting.

We all know that exercise and a good diet are important for health, protecting against heart disease and diabetes, among other conditions. But what exactly causes the health improvement from working up a sweat or from eating, say, more olive oil than saturated fat? And are some people biologically predisposed to get more benefit than others?

They're among questions that metabolic profiling, a new field called metabolomics, aims to answer in hopes of one day optimizing those benefits - or finding patterns that may signal risk for disease and new ways to treat it.

"We're only beginning to catalog the metabolic variability between people," says Dr. Robert Gerszten of Massachusetts General Hospital, whose team just took a step toward that goal.

The researchers measured biochemical changes in the blood of a variety of people: the healthy middle-aged, some who became short of breath with exertion, and marathon runners.

First, in 70 healthy people put on a treadmill, the team found more than 20 metabolites that change during exercise, naturally produced compounds involved in burning calories and fat and improving blood-sugar control. Some weren't known until now to be involved with exercise. Some revved up during exercise, like those involved in processing fat. Others involved with cellular stress decreased with exercise.

Those are pretty wonky findings, a first step in a complex field. But they back today's health advice that even brief bouts of activity are good.

"Ten minutes of exercise has at least an hour of effects on your body," says Gerszten, who found some of the metabolic changes that began after 10 minutes on the treadmill still were measurable 60 minutes after people cooled down.

Your heart rate rapidly drops back to normal when you quit moving, usually in 10 minutes or so. So finding lingering biochemical changes offers what Gerszten calls "tantalizing evidence" of how exercise may be building up longer-term benefits.

Back to the blood. Thinner people had greater increases in a metabolite named niacinamide, a nutrient byproduct that's involved in blood-sugar control, the team from Mass General and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard reported last week in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Checking a metabolite of fat breakdown, the team found people who were more fit - as measured by oxygen intake during exercise- appeared to be burning more fat than the less fit, or than people with shortness of breath, a possible symptom of heart disease.

The extremely fit - 25 Boston Marathon runners - had ten-fold increases in that metabolite after the race. Still other differences in metabolites allowed the researchers to tell which runners had finished in under four hours and which weren't as speedy.

"We have a chemical snapshot of what the more fit person looks like. Now we have to see if making someone's metabolism look like that snapshot, whether or not that's going to improve their performance," says Gerszten, whose ultimate goal is better cardiac care.

Don't expect a pill ever to substitute for a workout - the new work shows how complicated the body's response to exercise is, says metabolomics researcher Dr. Debbie Muoio of Duke University Medical Center.

But scientists are hunting nutritional compounds that might help tweak metabolic processes in specific ways. For example, Muoio discovered the muscles of diabetic animals lack enough of a metabolite named carnitine, and that feeding them more improved their control of blood sugar. Now, Muoio is beginning a pilot study in 25 older adults with pre-diabetes to see if carnitine supplements might work similarly in people who lack enough.

Next up: With University of Vermont researchers, she's testing how metabolic changes correlate with health measures in a study of people who alternate between a carefully controlled Mediterranean diet and higher-fat diets.

"The longterm hope is you could use this in making our way toward personalized medicine," Muoio says.__


Vitamin D (Calciferol)

Vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin. A fat-soluble vitamin dissolves and remains in the fatty tissues of the body, reducing the need to ingest large quantities. As such symptoms from a deficiency in fat-soluble vitamins may not be apparent for years. They should not be consumed in excess unless under strict medical supervision since toxic reactions from fat-soluble vitamins occur at a smaller percentage of the RDA than water-soluble vitamins.

Vitamin D is also known as the "sunshine vitamin," since it is manufactured by the body after being exposed to sunshine. Ten to fifteen minutes of sunshine three times per week is sufficient to produce the body's requirement of vitamin D. The liver and kidneys convert vitamin D from food sources or sunlight to its active form, calcitriol.

Vitamin D is essential for building and maintaining healthy bones because it helps maintain healthy levels of calcium and phosphorus. Vitamin D and calcium are involved in many body functions, including keeping the immune and nervous systems healthy. Calcium is also the principal element in bone, and can only be absorbed by the body when vitamin D is present. Rickets, a vitamin D deficiency disease responsible for softening and weakening bones in children, used to be quite common but is now quite rare in countries that have adopted the practice of fortifying milk products.

Different forms or alternative names for Vitamin D (Calciferol):
ergosterol
viosterol
calciferol
sunshine vitamin
cholecalciferol

Importance of Vitamin D (Calciferol):
improves absorption and utilization of calcium and phosphorous
required for bone and teeth formation
maintains a stable nervous system
maintains a healthy heart

Good sources of Vitamin D (Calciferol) are:
sardines, salmon, tuna, liver, egg yolk,

http://www. dietandfitnesstoday. com/vitaminD.php